Labour anti-Semitism row: Starmer meets MPs after Long-Bailey sacking – BBC News

  1. Labour anti-Semitism row: Starmer meets MPs after Long-Bailey sacking  BBC News
  2. UK Labour leader sacks former left-wing rival for sharing article with ‘anti-Semitic conspiracy theories’  Fox News
  3. Labour’s New Leader Fires Official Over Charges of Anti-Semitism  The New York Times
  4. Keir Starmer has made it clear that antisemitism is unacceptable – and removed an underperforming member of his top team  The Independent
  5. Long-Bailey’s sacking is another blow for the Corbynite Left  Telegraph.co.uk
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

Source: Google News | Labour anti-Semitism row: Starmer meets MPs after Long-Bailey sacking – BBC News

Mophie and InvisibleShield are making UV sanitizers for your phone

With cellphones being known carriers of germs, and coronavirus prompting all of us to wash our hands and clean the objects around us, it’s no surprise that more UV sanitizers made for phones are hitting the market. Mobile electronics company Zagg is…
Source: Engadget | Mophie and InvisibleShield are making UV sanitizers for your phone

NASA crowdsources new ideas for astronaut space toilets, offers $20G – Fox News

  1. NASA crowdsources new ideas for astronaut space toilets, offers $20G  Fox News
  2. Drain brain: Nasa offers prize money for best lunar loo design  The Guardian
  3. NASA is offering $20,000 in ‘Lunar Loo’ build-a-toilet challenge – Business Insider  Business Insider
  4. NASA and HeroX Launch Lunar Loo Challenge to Find Way for Astronauts to Poop on the Moon  Yahoo! Voices
  5. The Apollo Program: How NASA sent astronauts to the moon  Space.com
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

Source: Google News | NASA crowdsources new ideas for astronaut space toilets, offers G – Fox News

Biden leads in key battleground states, Fox News poll shows – New York Post

  1. Biden leads in key battleground states, Fox News poll shows  New York Post
  2. Polls show Trump facing prospect of landslide loss  CNN
  3. It’s time to rethink the presidential debates  The Washington Post
  4. 2020 Election: If Republicans care about America, they should vote for Joe Biden  USA TODAY
  5. Biden’s low-key virtual campaign is a gamble on Trump fatigue  Fox News
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

Source: Google News | Biden leads in key battleground states, Fox News poll shows – New York Post

Ford's new F-150 is its first with a hybrid V6 engine

The F-150 is an iconic vehicle — that’s why Elon Musk targeted it while unveiling Tesla’s Cybertruck — and tonight Ford’s taking the wraps off of its latest iteration. Along with being the “most connected” F-150 ever, this 2021 model also marks the d…
Source: Engadget | Ford's new F-150 is its first with a hybrid V6 engine

Around the Horn discusses NASCAR releasing image of noose in Bubba Wallace's garage – ESPN

  1. Around the Horn discusses NASCAR releasing image of noose in Bubba Wallace’s garage  ESPN
  2. NASCAR releases photo of noose in Bubba Wallace’s garage stall, explains investigation that ended with no charges  Yahoo Sports
  3. NASCAR releases photo of ‘noose’ found in Bubba Wallace’s garage  Fox News
  4. NASCAR releases photo of rope found hanging in Wallace’s garage; Investigation finds it was coincidence  FOX Carolina
  5. Owner of 311 Speedway in North Carolina removes ad offering ‘Bubba Rope’ for sale  USA TODAY
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

Source: Google News | Around the Horn discusses NASCAR releasing image of noose in Bubba Wallace's garage – ESPN

Karat launches a credit card for online creators

Karat is a new startup promising to build better banking products for the creators who make a living on YouTube, Instagram, Twitch and other online platforms. Today it’s unveiling its first product — the Karat Black Card.

The startup, which was part of accelerator Y Combinator’s Winter 2020 batch, is also announcing that it has raised $4.6 million in seed funding from Twitch co-founder Kevin Lin, SignalFire, YC, CRV and Coatue.

Co-founder and co-CEO Eric Wei knows the creator world well, thanks to his time as product manager for Instagram Live. (His co-founder Will Kim was previously an investor with seed fund Lucky Capital.) Wei told me that although many creators have significant incomes, banks rarely understand their business or offer them good terms when they need capital.

“Traditional banks care a lot about FICO [credit scores],” he said. “A lot of YouTubers, when they’re blowing up, they don’t have time to think: Let me make sure my FICO is awesome as well.”

At the same time, he argued that creators have become suspicious of potentially scammy financial offers, to the point that if you were to attend a pre-COVID VidCon and tried to give out $3,000, “The good creators will not take it, even if you tell them there are no strings behind it.”

Karat co-founders Will Kim and Eric Wei

With the Karat Black Card, the startup is giving creators a credit card that they can use for their business-related expenses. When creators are approved, they receive a $250 bonus that can be applied to any future purchases of electronics or equipment. The card also comes with custom designs, 2% to 5% cash back on purchases and it even offers advances on sponsorship payments.

Underlying it, Wei said Karat has developed an underwriting model that works for creators. Instead of looking at credit scores, Karat focuses on the size of a creator’s following, their current revenue and whether or not they’re “business savvy.”

“It’s not just the number of followers you have, but what platforms,” Wei added. “I would rather have 100,000 subscribers on YouTube than 1 million on TikTok, because on TikTok, it’s all algorithmically driven.”

Karat has already provided the card to an initial group of creators, including TheRussianBadger, TierZoo and Nas Daily. Wei said the model is working so far, with no defaults.

For now, the card is aimed at professional, full-time creators who have at least 100,000 followers. Wei estimated that that’s a potential customer base of 1 million creators. Eventually, he wants to provide those creators with more than a black card.

“We’re building a vertical financial and biz ops experience,” he said. “People in earlier stages, we do want to get to them eventually, but only after we feel like we’ve developed enough of an underwriting model.”


Source: Tech Crunch Startups | Karat launches a credit card for online creators

Comcast is the first ISP to join Mozilla's push for more secure browsing

Mozilla’s effort to secure domain name requests now has a major new ally: Comcast. The cable giant’s Xfinity brand has become the first internet provider to provide encrypted DNS services through Mozilla’s Trusted Recursive Resolver program. If you’r…
Source: Engadget | Comcast is the first ISP to join Mozilla's push for more secure browsing

Demographic report on protests shows how much info our phones give away

If you marched in recent Black Lives Matter protests in Atlanta, Los Angeles, Minneapolis or New York, there’s a chance the mobile analytics company Mobilewalla gleaned demographic data from your cellphone use. Last week, Mobilewalla released a repor…
Source: Engadget | Demographic report on protests shows how much info our phones give away

Four perspectives: Will Apple trim App Store fees?

The fact that Apple takes a 30% cut of subscriptions purchased via the App Store isn’t news. But since the company threatened to boot email app Hey from the platform last week unless its developers paid the customary tribute, the tech world and lawmakers are giving Apple’s revenue share a harder look.

Although Apple’s Senior Vice President of worldwide marketing Phil Schiller denied the company was making any changes, a new policy will let developers challenge the very rules by which they were rejected from the platform, which suggests that change is in the air.

According to its own numbers, the App Store facilitated more than $500 billion in e-commerce transactions in 2019. For reference, the federal government has given out about $529 billion in loans to U.S. businesses as part of the Paycheck Protection Program.

Given its massive reach, is it time for Apple to change its terms? Will it allow its revenue share to go gently into that good night, or does it have enough resources to keep new legislation at bay and mollify an increasingly vocal community of software developers? To examine these questions, four TechCrunch staffers weighed in:

Devin Coldewey: The App Store fee structure “seems positively extortionate”

Apple is starting to see that its simplistic and paternalistic approach to cultivating the app economy may be doing more harm than good. That wasn’t always the case: In earlier days it was worth paying Apple simply for the privilege of taking part in its fast-expanding marketplace.

But the digital economy has moved on from the conditions that drove growth before: Novelty at first, then a burgeoning ad market supercharged by social media. The pendulum is swinging back to more traditional modes of payment: one-time and subscription payments for no-nonsense services. Imagine that!

Combined with the emergence of mobile platforms not just as tools for simple consumption and communication but for serious work and productivity, the stakes have risen. People have started asking, what value is Apple really providing in return for the rent it seeks from anyone who wants to use its platform?

Surely Apple is due something for its troubles, but just over a quarter of a company’s revenue? What seemed merely excessive for a 99-cent app that a pair of developers were just happy to sell a few thousand copies of now seems positively extortionate.

Apple is in a position of strength and could continue shaking down the industry, but it is wary of losing partners in the effort to make its platform truly conducive to productivity. The market is larger and more complicated, with cross-platform and cross-device complications of which the App Store and iOS may only be a small part — but demanding an incredibly outsized share.

It will loosen the grip, but there’s no hurry. It would be a costly indignity to be too permissive and have its new rules be gamed and hastily revised. Allowing developers to push back on rules they don’t like gives Apple a lot to work with but no commitment. Big players will get a big voice, no doubt, and the new normal for the App Store will reflect a detente between moneyed interests, not a generous change of heart by Apple.

Source: Tech Crunch Mobiles | Four perspectives: Will Apple trim App Store fees?